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Folding, Foundation, and Feet

Recorded live in a Feldenkrais Awareness Through Movement (ATM) class, the lesson below is copyright Nick Strauss-Klein, for personal use only. This and all our audio lessons are 100% donor-supported. Before you begin, read this first for practical tips and your responsibilities, and check out Comfort & Configuration below. Click the other lesson note tabs if you’re curious.

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Back-lying, knees bent, integrating bending of the ankles through the joints of the legs and into the pelvis and lower back, blending into a classic Feldenkrais lesson which draws the head, elbows, and knees toward each other in different combinations. Improve the folding and unfolding of the body through refining coordination of the flexor muscles, building awareness of the use of the ground (foundation), and lengthening the extensors.
  • As you get into the movements of the lesson you’ll notice quickly that they resemble traditional abdominal exercises you may be familiar with. Please minimize the size and effort, and maximize your comfort instead. In this learning context there’s no value to fatiguing your muscles.
  • Experiment with how you hold your head with your interlaced hands to find the most comfortable way. You may want to hold a lot of your neck along with the base of your skull.
  • There’s never any goal to make the elbow and knee touch in these movements; they are simply aiming toward each other. Often through the course of the lesson they will spontaneously start to get much closer, or perhaps touch, but this is not due to more effort. In fact we’re looking for you to use less effort to fold as you become more efficient and get free of unnecessary muscle tonus in your back that is competing with the folding.
  • Those who are very flexible can simply move the elbow and knee past each other, with the elbow brushing sometimes the inside of the knee, sometimes the outside.

This recording begins with a three minute talk about what Feldenkrais is and isn’t, and how Feldenkrais movements are always in service of awareness, even when they resemble traditional exercise. Why build awareness? Because our awareness is what regulates how we behave.

This lesson is found in the Standing, Walking, and Running collection.

Like most of our lessons, this one can be studied out of context, but you may find additional learning value by approaching it in the order of the collection it’s in.

The lesson mentioned from “last week” was Floating Toward Bridging. If you’ve come this page as the second lesson in our Standing, Walking, and Running collection you’ll notice I’ve elected not to include Floating Toward Bridging in this collection, but it’s fine to do that lesson any time if you’re curious. There are also many related bridging ideas in the next Standing, Walking, and Running collection lesson.

Members and Patrons only. Please login or join the Project to download this lesson’s MP3 file.


Members and Patrons only. Please login or join the Project to view Nick’s comments about sources he used while developing this lesson.


Members and Patrons only. Please login or join the Project to view related lesson titles and links.

This is a refinement and refocusing of an older lesson called Folding, Foundation, and Length. Logged in Patrons can listen to this alternate teaching in the Legacy and Alternate Lessons collection.


Please login or join the Project as Patron to access Legacy and Alternate lessons.

Comfort & Configuration
  • As you get into the movements of the lesson you’ll notice quickly that they resemble traditional abdominal exercises you may be familiar with. Please minimize the size and effort, and maximize your comfort instead. In this learning context there’s no value to fatiguing your muscles.
  • Experiment with how you hold your head with your interlaced hands to find the most comfortable way. You may want to hold a lot of your neck along with the base of your skull.
  • There’s never any goal to make the elbow and knee touch in these movements; they are simply aiming toward each other. Often through the course of the lesson they will spontaneously start to get much closer, or perhaps touch, but this is not due to more effort. In fact we’re looking for you to use less effort to fold as you become more efficient and get free of unnecessary muscle tonus in your back that is competing with the folding.
  • Those who are very flexible can simply move the elbow and knee past each other, with the elbow brushing sometimes the inside of the knee, sometimes the outside.
Curiosities

This recording begins with a three minute talk about what Feldenkrais is and isn’t, and how Feldenkrais movements are always in service of awareness, even when they resemble traditional exercise. Why build awareness? Because our awareness is what regulates how we behave.

Context

This lesson is found in the Standing, Walking, and Running collection.

Like most of our lessons, this one can be studied out of context, but you may find additional learning value by approaching it in the order of the collection it’s in.

The lesson mentioned from “last week” was Floating Toward Bridging. If you’ve come this page as the second lesson in our Standing, Walking, and Running collection you’ll notice I’ve elected not to include Floating Toward Bridging in this collection, but it’s fine to do that lesson any time if you’re curious. There are also many related bridging ideas in the next Standing, Walking, and Running collection lesson.

Download

Members and Patrons only. Please login or join the Project to download this lesson’s MP3 file.

Source

Members and Patrons only. Please login or join the Project to view Nick’s comments about sources he used while developing this lesson.

Related Lessons

Members and Patrons only. Please login or join the Project to view related lesson titles and links.

Alternate Version

This is a refinement and refocusing of an older lesson called Folding, Foundation, and Length. Logged in Patrons can listen to this alternate teaching in the Legacy and Alternate Lessons collection.


Please login or join the Project as Patron to access Legacy and Alternate lessons.

We all thrive when more people are doing more Feldenkrais. Please share this resource!

21 Comments. Leave new

  • Avatar
    Stephanie Achatzi
    March 8, 2016 2:17 am

    What a wonderful folding lesson. To connect the folding of the upper torso with the lifting of the foot and the tilting of the pelvis, helped me to engage my lower back in the movement. Never before I felt it that clearly. Thank you! Stephanie

    Reply
    • Nick Strauss-Klein
      Nick Strauss-Klein
      March 8, 2016 11:10 pm

      I love how this lesson clarifies the lower back too! As I wrote in the notes, I really am indebted to Mark Reese for his linking of classic folding the torso with the flexion of the feet and pelvis.

      Reply
  • I have done a lot of Feldenkrais with many instructors and your lesson are no doubt the best I have experienced. Thank you for sharing these.

    Reply
  • What a fantastic lesson, I’ve been struggling with various forms of somatic practice, feldenkrais, Alexander etc. believing that there is something there for me that would unlock a lot of tired long term tension, but simply haven’t been able to really tap into anything more then a vague feeling of relaxation, never real change. This lesson was completely different it’s as though I found a new sit-up, a new torso… a new center.
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Nick Strauss-Klein
      Nick Strauss-Klein
      January 7, 2018 10:06 am

      Thanks for your comment! I’m so glad to hear you found new ideas and experiences, and I hope you explore many more lessons! Please spread the word.

      Reply
  • Avatar
    Sigurdson Chris
    April 16, 2018 7:44 pm

    Great lesson . At the end of a day of standing, this puts me back in a more functional posture and relieves back strain. I breathe more fully too!

    Reply
  • This is a lesson that I repeat regularly to center my frame, balance and posture. Each time I repeat, my awareness grows deeper. So do the connections that carry so magically into my walking and increasingly bring lasting relief to chronic back, hip and shoulder pain. Thank you for teaching me how to walk again!

    Reply
  • I did the lesson two days ago, because I have an issue in one of my knees. And it worked, my knee hurts less. But I also enjoyed very much the lesson because of the playfulness, originality and creativity. Thanks Nick

    Reply
  • That was wonderful, thank you!

    Reply
  • That was so . . . . Feldenkrais. . . At first, my upper shoulders/back were working to fold, and at the end no! My lower back area was doing the pressures. It was risky of me because my SCM does a lot of work in sit ups, but it seems to handle well. . . sure I’ll need to repeat this lesson many times.

    Reply
  • I have to update. I work up with a sore tight neck from this and tight traps. Obviously I’m straining there even though I’m not aware. When this happens in Feldenkrais, where you lack the awareness and ability to relax those muscles that want to fire, does that mean this lesson is too advanced?? I would love to know about how to be able to get progression in feldenkrais. Because my awareness is very low and coordination in good movements as well. Thanks

    Reply
    • Nick Strauss-Klein
      Nick Strauss-Klein
      May 8, 2020 5:31 pm

      Thanks for the update. Sometimes a lesson sends us in a direction before we’re ready to change a particular aspect of our long-held patterns. It’s hard to tell from a distance, but that’s my guess here. For now, I would avoid lessons where you have to lift your head while lying on your back (like this one), or just simulate (imagine) these steps in lessons where this movement comes up but it’s not the primary focus. Lessons with very neck-passive rolling of the head may be helpful, like when you use a palm or back of your hand on your forehead to do the rolling. Also lessons working with pelvis mobility with head awareness: Your Navigational Pelvis comes to mind.

      Reply
  • wow you nailed it on the spot. I know they are engraved patterns in me. By sticking to the lessons that you have mentioned, will that with time help me get rid of those patterns, will it be enough to get rid of those long-held patterns?? And how do you know when to try more?? Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Nick Strauss-Klein
      Nick Strauss-Klein
      May 11, 2020 2:32 pm

      Hard to answer in detail from afar (and even in person I can’t predict the future) but these two related principles may help: Feldenkrais learning is powered by your authentic curiosity, and therefore there’s little learning value to rote movement. So if you feel safe, engaged, joyful, comfortable, and better after particular lessons, by all means you can stick with only a very few lessons. But as soon as you’re feeling not so sure about those things or a little bored, it may be time to venture out into other lessons. Done small and lightly enough (even in your imagination) any lesson can inspire curiosity, expand awareness, and be beneficial to anyone. I see you’re a Member, so you can use the Related Lessons tabs on lessons you love to help you follow lines of learning that are working well for you.

      Reply
  • Thanks so much. That was very helpful info

    Reply
  • Could you do more lessons on this? One of my ankles has a tough time with this. I twisted it years ago and it seems to be perpetually twisted in towards the arch. It has improved with this lesson but I’m wondering if other ankle or foot lessons would also be helpful.

    Reply
    • Nick Strauss-Klein
      Nick Strauss-Klein
      September 6, 2020 3:42 pm

      Besides the foot-related lesson mentioned in the Related Lessons tab, there are several in this first collection (Lessons for Standing, Walking, and Running) which address the organization of the feet and ankles. Check out the lesson descriptions for mentions of feet, or simply work your way through the whole series. You may also be interested in the use of the feet in Lesson 3 of our introductory Getting Oriented series.

      Reply
  • Hi Nick, although I’ve done this lesson a few times, it always amazes me how much more I discover each time! and how much taller I feel when I stand up after! thank you so much for this!

    Reply
  • Avatar
    Steve Chambers
    January 20, 2021 3:23 am

    I found quite some benefit in spine awareness thinking of this as spine like a chain backwards. Some of the areas below the shoulder blades became freer in a way I couldn’t achieve in the chain lesson.

    Reply
  • Avatar
    Dorota Puchala
    March 23, 2021 10:53 am

    Wanderf teaching as always! Thank you again and again for being amaizing inspitation to my practice of lerning , intergrating lesson into my own body and making teaching comunity class easy and clear 🙏
    Dorota

    Reply

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