Position: transitioning or rolling

58m

What Is Good Posture? (Patrons)

Standing, chair-seated, and transitioning between. Experience for yourself Moshe Feldenkrais's three-part answer to his lesson title: 1) Good posture is synonymous with the greatest potential for action. 2) Whether we're standing, sitting, or anywhere in between, in good posture our bones (not our muscles) must continuously counteract gravity, leaving our musculature free for action. 3) Posture improves spontaneously when we eliminate superfluous efforts in the sit-stand-sit transition, as we become more sensitive to the physics and neurology of that function. A 5-minute talk begins the recording. Demonstrations and principles are in the Clarifications and Curiosities tabs.
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60m

Getting Free with a Bell Hand (Patrons)

Mostly in a "three-quarters prone" position (halfway between side-lying and front-lying). Learn to use a gently pulsing "bell hand" to calm and regulate your nervous system, and to help you organize larger, more demanding movements with greater freedom and skill. See the lesson notes for a recommended prerequisite lesson.
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58m

Finding Sensations of Not Shortening (Patrons)

Side-lying and front-lying with optional rolling, framed by brief standing explorations. Movement riddles for the chest, shoulders, neck, spine, and legs are presented in a focused context of lengthening. Uses sensory images of the five cardinal lines of the body, breathing, organizing the “core,” and expanding into the support surface to create opportunities to sense and inhibit unnecessary shortening. Begins with a summary of what we're exploring.
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64m

Perfecting the Self-Image (Patrons)

Seated, back-lying, and eventually transitioning between, all while holding one foot in two hands. This lesson clarifies how our attention and sensory motor imagination can be consciously harnessed to improve our self-image, options, and behavior, since – as Moshe writes – "We act in accordance with our self-image."
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58m

Arms Like a Skeleton, Freeing the Shoulders and Neck (Patrons)

Back-lying, side-lying, transitioning. This detailed exploration starts simply then dives deep into variations designed to help you get to know your scapulas and improve their relationship with your spine, chest, pelvis, neck, and head.
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59m

Side-lying Twist, and Rolling Recap (Patrons)

Back-lying, side-lying, transitioning, and eventually circling the arm. Recorded as the third in a series (see the Related Lessons tab). With plenty of room for improvisation, this lesson builds on recent classes and discussions with students about encountering difficulty in Feldenkrais study. Starts and ends with three-minute talks.
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51m

Rolling and Hips Like a Baby (Patrons)

Back-lying. Free your hips, shoulders, chest, and back as you explore rolling and weight shifting. Designed to help you add suppleness to your movements, expand your mental image of rolling in internal and external ways, and peek into the developmental neurological value of rolling and the substantial improvements available to most adults.
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63m

Freeing the Neck with Crawling and Rolling (Patrons)

Front-lying, back-lying, transitioning. Improving integration of the head, neck, shoulders, and chest through explorations of crawling movements and improvisations toward rolling.
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62m

Reaching, Twisting, and Gazing Smoothly (Patrons)

Side-lying, learning to reach, turn, twist, and roll effortlessly by improving integration of the rotation functions of the axis (head, spine, and pelvis) with movements of the hands, arms, shoulders, chest, breath...and eyes! The Curiosities tab has notes from an introductory discussion with the students before this lesson was recorded.
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57m

Folding, Arching, and Rolling (Patrons)

Mostly side-lying. Refining our awareness and skill for the many ways we can gather the front of the body together (folding) and also lengthen it (arching), including very fine work with the spine, sternum (breastbone), and shoulders. Integration of breathing with these ideas. Experiments at the end of the lesson turn these primary functions into rolling.
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