Position: back-lying

98m

Workshop: TCF 10 Year Celebration (Patrons)

A public workshop celebrating 10 years of Nick's Twin Cities Feldenkrais classes at the St. Paul JCC, suitable for newcomers and long-timers alike. The first of the three lesson recordings is only available here.
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68m

Workshop: Spinal Support and a Powerful Pelvis (Patrons)

This full workshop recording presents two short talks and two lessons on the theme of Stretch without Strain. Patrons can listen to the full, uninterrupted workshop on this page. All users can access the separate, edited tracks in our Getting Oriented collection.
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65m

Easing the Jaw, Neck, and Shoulders

Back-lying, briefly framed by seated explorations. Exploring and refining basic movements of the jaw, and integrating them with movements of the head, neck, and shoulders. This lesson is often helpful for reducing many types of jaw-related tension and discomfort, including some kinds of headaches, TMJ pain (temporomandibular joint), and discomfort and stiffness in the neck, shoulders, and spine. The recording begins with an important discussion. NOTE: There's a recommended prerequisite in the lesson notes.
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33m

Lengthening the Arms, Freeing the Scapulas (33m, Patrons)

Back-lying, knees bent, arms often resting loosely upwards on the floor, and in self-hug position at other times. Lengthening the arms, differentiating the head, and expanding the mobility and self-image of the shoulder blades (scapulas).
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64m

Advanced Folding (Patrons)

Back-lying, knees bent, drawing the head, elbows, and knees toward each other in different combinations, followed by more advanced variations. Improve the folding and unfolding of the body through refining coordination of the flexor muscles with the simultaneously lengthening extensors. Includes detailed work with the hips and eventually lengthening the hamstrings while flexing elsewhere. (A prerequisite lesson may be recommended; see Comfort & Configuration in the lesson notes.)
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63m

Spine and Chest Side-Bending, Lengthening Limbs

Framed by standing explorations of how we shift weight onto one foot, this mostly back-lying lesson (often one or both knees bent) is designed to free the torso and improve awareness, suppleness, and integration of lateral movements of the spine and chest in walking. Includes explorations of sensing and initiating movement from the spine.
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65m

Walking with Your Sternum (Patrons)

Back-lying, often knees bent. Learning how preparatory movements for taking a step involve the whole self, by sensing and exploring movements of the sternum, both as a reference and a challenge to expand the self-image of walking. Lengthening and sweeping the arms in many directions encourages suppleness of the chest and awareness of the sternum, and helps integrate them with movements of the pelvis, hips, and walking.
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61m

Nodding into Lengthening the Heels (Patrons)

Back-lying, often one or both knees bent, exploring relationships of "nodding" parts of ourselves in the sagittal (up/down) plane, including head, pelvis, one foot, and two feet, to better organize the full unfolding of the legs and send our heels into the world, a function essential for clear skeletal support while standing or walking.
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32m

Supple Ankles, Shifting Pelvis (32 min, Patrons)

Framed by explorations in standing, this mostly back-lying lesson explores how improvements in the sensitivity and function of the ankles and feet relate to movements of shifting and turning the hip joints, pelvis, spine, and chest.
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59m

Basic Arching and Folding (Patrons)

Front-lying, improving the organization of the extensor muscles of the back and distributing their efforts. Learning to lift the head and one arm – and later, one leg – away from the ground together. Integrating the eyes with these arching movements. Alternates with back-lying, knees bent, feet standing, basic folding (flexion) movements, as the brain is always coordinating the major flexors and extensors of the body with each other.
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