Difficulty: More Challenging

58m

What Is Good Posture? (Patrons)

Standing, chair-seated, and transitioning between. Experience for yourself Moshe Feldenkrais's three-part answer to his lesson title: 1) Good posture is synonymous with the greatest potential for action. 2) Whether we're standing, sitting, or anywhere in between, in good posture our bones (not our muscles) must continuously counteract gravity, leaving our musculature free for action. 3) Posture improves spontaneously when we eliminate superfluous efforts in the sit-stand-sit transition, as we become more sensitive to the physics and neurology of that function. A 5-minute talk begins the recording. Demonstrations and principles are in the Clarifications and Curiosities tabs.
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61m

Sliding the Sternum, Integrating the Neck, Shoulders, and Chest (Patrons)

Side-lying. Gentle movements of lifting the head and looking toward the floor are used to integrate the eyes, neck, shoulders, chest, spine, and pelvis in increasingly sophisticated movements. Later, learn to differentiate the sternum and soften the chest further by maneuvering your sternum and ribs with your fingers.
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59m

Dynamic Balance: Coordinates of the Head (Patrons)

Back, front, and side-lying, framed by explorations of dynamic balance in standing. Soften your chest, integrate your head, spine, and pelvis, and improve your balance, posture, and breathing by learning to circle your head in your hands in many lying down configurations.
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57m

“Beard Pull” Pecking, with Chanukia (Patrons)

Back-lying, exploring pecking movements to create ease, clarity, and better carriage of the head, neck, shoulders, and spine. Uses the playful image of having a chin beard that an imaginary friend gently pulls toward the ceiling. Movements from the Chanukia lesson are used to develop possibilities. A link to that prerequisite lesson is in the Comfort & Configuration tab.
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65m

“Generalize Your Skills” (Patrons)

Front-lying. Become more skillful in everyday and high-performance actions by expanding your perception of the diagonals of the back of your body, with the help of an imaginary ball gradually rolling over you. Begins with a 5-minute talk about principles at work in this lesson.
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60m

Getting Free with a Bell Hand (Patrons)

Mostly in a "three-quarters prone" position (halfway between side-lying and front-lying). Learn to use a gently pulsing "bell hand" to calm and regulate your nervous system, and to help you organize larger, more demanding movements with greater freedom and skill. See the lesson notes for a recommended prerequisite lesson.
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58m

Improving Rotation, Embracing Our Differences (Patrons)

Back-lying, often using the self-hug configuration, as well as front-lying. Learning to better sense, differentiate, and skillfully integrate turning your head, neck, shoulders, chest, spine, and pelvis. Best for experienced Felden-fans, see the Context tab for links to recommended prerequisite lessons.
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61m

A Dynamic “Core” Lengthens the Spine (Patrons)

(Advanced lesson. Be sure to read Comfort & Configuration notes) Back-lying, often knees bent. Using a reference image of the five lines of the body, movements of folding the legs create gentle challenges to awareness and self-regulation as you first let the pelvis move freely, then later dynamically stabilize it. While the "core" reckons with the weight of the legs, you'll explore how to maintain simplicity and length in the spine, easy fullness of breathing, and efficiency of effort.
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64m

Perfecting the Self-Image (Patrons)

Seated, back-lying, and eventually transitioning between, all while holding one foot in two hands. This lesson clarifies how our attention and sensory motor imagination can be consciously harnessed to improve our self-image, options, and behavior, since – as Moshe writes – "We act in accordance with our self-image."
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61m

Free While Constrained: Side-Bent, Stepping Down (Patrons)

Mostly back-lying, some front-lying. Enjoy the rich internal reconfigurations and freedoms that are prompted as you learn how to use your legs and pelvis with ease while your head, spine, ribs, and shoulders are constrained in a gentle side-bent position. Themes of skeletal support and sensing your primary spinal bias are also touched on. The bias is discussed briefly after the lesson.
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